Covid-19 in the day-to-day
Viviane, Federal Police Officer
Viviane

Federal Police Officer

People have less and less respect for the police. This has become even more true during the pandemic. It’s noticeable that we’ve become a punching bag.

The pandemic has brought changes to both Viviane’s professional life and her private life. Like all working parents, she finds the current childcare situation difficult, especially when grandparents cannot help out because they are at high risk from the virus. Viviane currently spends a large portion of her workday enforcing face mask and social distancing requirements. Understandably, no one particularly likes wearing a face mask or staying far apart from other people. Nonetheless, everyone should do their part to get the pandemic under control more quickly. This saves time and avoids stress, which is urgently needed these days. That is why Viviane wishes people had more understanding for her and her colleagues: “Sometimes”, she says, “I feel like people forget there’s a human being under my mask.”

Sabrina, Firefighter
Sabrina

Firefighter

We’ll never get through this pandemic if everyone goes it alone. The restrictions are intrusive for all of us, but we need to go along with them if we want them to end soon.

At the fire station, Sabrina and her team spend 12- or 24-hour shifts together, which makes them feel like a family. “We exercise together, we cook and eat together, we have a shared sleeping area, we go on firefighting calls together and we deal with our firefighting experiences afterwards together. That builds strong bonds between us and is what makes working in the fire service so unique. The coronavirus measures have made it more difficult for us to work together and be together. The things we worked on hand in hand earlier now have to be achieved with more distance. That is why it’s especially disappointing when some people don’t follow the rules: it makes me sad to see how careless many people are still acting in this difficult situation.”

Manuel, Paramedic
Manuel

Paramedic

Covid can affect anyone. It’s not only older people – young and physically active people can get it too. When I’m working it’s always in the back of my mind that I could get it too.

Manuel has been working as a paramedic for 20 years. His job is more important than ever during the pandemic, and he is aware of this. His shifts are more difficult than before the pandemic, both physically and mentally, but he does not let himself get discouraged. He loves his profession and accepts that the risks that come with his work are a necessary part of being able to save lives. For this reason, he wishes society would show more understanding and consideration. “Covid can affect anyone”, he says. “It’s not only older people – young and physically active people can get it too. When I’m working it’s always in the back of my mind that I could get it too.”

Fabienne, Federal Agency for Technical Relief volunteer
Fabienne

Federal Agency for Technical Relief volunteer

Before Christmas we built a coronavirus test centre very quickly. The public showed a lot of appreciation for this. You can see that people are taking the pandemic very seriously and everyone is pitching in to help it end sooner.

The Federal Agency for Technical Relief’s volunteer work has changed since the pandemic started. Fabienne and her team are now usually assigned to help with transport, pick up masks and hygiene items, or build test and vaccination centres. Wearing a mask makes physical labour more strenuous, and the team has to be careful to observe social distancing rules with each other while they’re working. This is especially difficult when it comes to emergency management work that has to be done together. This makes Fabienne appreciate her fellow volunteers’ respectful and collegial attitude towards each other all the more: “We set a good example by adhering strictly to the rules ourselves. We hope that this also inspires other people to act in a spirit of solidarity in this difficult time.”

Viviane, Federal Police Officer
Viviane

Federal Police Officer

People have less and less respect for the police. This has become even more true during the pandemic. It’s noticeable that we’ve become a punching bag.

The pandemic has brought changes to both Viviane’s professional life and her private life. Like all working parents, she finds the current childcare situation difficult, especially when grandparents cannot help out because they are at high risk from the virus. Viviane currently spends a large portion of her workday enforcing face mask and social distancing requirements. Understandably, no one particularly likes wearing a face mask or staying far apart from other people. Nonetheless, everyone should do their part to get the pandemic under control more quickly. This saves time and avoids stress, which is urgently needed these days. That is why Viviane wishes people had more understanding for her and her colleagues: “Sometimes”, she says, “I feel like people forget there’s a human being under my mask.”

Sabrina, Firefighter
Sabrina

Firefighter

We’ll never get through this pandemic if everyone goes it alone. The restrictions are intrusive for all of us, but we need to go along with them if we want them to end soon.

At the fire station, Sabrina and her team spend 12- or 24-hour shifts together, which makes them feel like a family. “We exercise together, we cook and eat together, we have a shared sleeping area, we go on firefighting calls together and we deal with our firefighting experiences afterwards together. That builds strong bonds between us and is what makes working in the fire service so unique. The coronavirus measures have made it more difficult for us to work together and be together. The things we worked on hand in hand earlier now have to be achieved with more distance. That is why it’s especially disappointing when some people don’t follow the rules: it makes me sad to see how careless many people are still acting in this difficult situation.”

Manuel, Paramedic
Manuel

Paramedic

Covid can affect anyone. It’s not only older people – young and physically active people can get it too. When I’m working it’s always in the back of my mind that I could get it too.

Manuel has been working as a paramedic for 20 years. His job is more important than ever during the pandemic, and he is aware of this. His shifts are more difficult than before the pandemic, both physically and mentally, but he does not let himself get discouraged. He loves his profession and accepts that the risks that come with his work are a necessary part of being able to save lives. For this reason, he wishes society would show more understanding and consideration. “Covid can affect anyone”, he says. “It’s not only older people – young and physically active people can get it too. When I’m working it’s always in the back of my mind that I could get it too.”

Fabienne, Federal Agency for Technical Relief volunteer
Fabienne

Federal Agency for Technical Relief volunteer

Before Christmas we built a coronavirus test centre very quickly. The public showed a lot of appreciation for this. You can see that people are taking the pandemic very seriously and everyone is pitching in to help it end sooner.

The Federal Agency for Technical Relief’s volunteer work has changed since the pandemic started. Fabienne and her team are now usually assigned to help with transport, pick up masks and hygiene items, or build test and vaccination centres. Wearing a mask makes physical labour more strenuous, and the team has to be careful to observe social distancing rules with each other while they’re working. This is especially difficult when it comes to emergency management work that has to be done together. This makes Fabienne appreciate her fellow volunteers’ respectful and collegial attitude towards each other all the more: “We set a good example by adhering strictly to the rules ourselves. We hope that this also inspires other people to act in a spirit of solidarity in this difficult time.”